Vicis’ upside-down Zero1 football helmet could reduce brain trauma


An “upside down” helmet could be the answer to football’s concussion epidemic.

Zero1, a prototype from the Seattle startup, vicischannels the protection techniques of a car bumper by deforming slightly on impact and then springing back into shape.

Unlike standard helmets, the design is soft on the outside and hard on the inside to slow impact before it hits the head.

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An “upside down” helmet could be the answer to football’s concussion epidemic. Zero1, a prototype from Seattle startup Vicis, channels the protection techniques of a car bumper by deforming slightly on impact and then springing back into shape

THE “UPSIDE DOWN” HELMET

Zero1 has a soft outer layer, called “Lode Shell”, which slows down impact as it deforms.

Below, the “middle layer” is made up of small vertical struts to allow the shell to bend and deform.

The hard shell normally found on the outside of the helmet, called the “Arch”, is sandwiched between the middle layer and the form liner.

The Arch Shell protects the skull, padded with a memory foam liner.

Zero1’s chin bar has four snaps, two of which connect to the inner shell to limit energy flow to the jaw.

The $1,500 design aims to make the helmets more secure without drastically changing the look, Vicis CEO and co-founder Dave Marver explained to Bloomberg Company.

You may not be able to see the difference right away, but you can hear it; when slammed on the ground, the helmet lets out a slight “blow”.

This is due to the softer outer shell, called “Lode Shell”, which makes Zero1 unique.

This layer slows impact by crumpling, and small vertical supports in the middle layer below allow the material to bend and deform to slow impact.

The hard shell normally found on the outside of the helmet, called the “Arch”, is sandwiched between the middle layer and the form liner.

The Arch Shell protects the skull, padded with a memory foam liner.

The initial design of Zero1, created by Artefact, captured the traditional style that Vicis hoped to maintain, and Vicis engineers built on it to make it state-of-the-art technology.

“Artefact, a Seattle-based design firm, created the initial design.

“Their approach to design is this idea of ​​’modern-classic’ heritage in football, full of tradition and history,” said Kurt Fischer, director of design and usability at Vicis, in a Questions and answers.

Unlike standard helmets, the design is soft on the outside and hard on the inside to slow impact before it hits the head.  The $1500 design aims to make helmets safer without drastically changing the look.  When pressed to the ground, the helmet lets out a slight

Unlike standard helmets, the design is soft on the outside and hard on the inside to slow impact before it hits the head. The $1500 design aims to make helmets safer without drastically changing the look. When tackled to the ground, the helmet lets out a slight “blow”

Zero1 has a soft outer layer, called

Zero1 has a soft outer layer, called “Lode Shell”, which slows down impact as it deforms. Below, the “middle layer” is made up of small vertical struts to allow the shell to bend and deform. The hard shell normally found on the outside of the helmet, called the “arch”, is sandwiched between the middle layer and the form liner

‘Artefact wanted to respect this, incorporating a vintage look. At the same time, they wanted it to be contemporary. Together we are working to modernize a classic in some way.

“We want to take the feel of the past and add a new high-tech look to the modern world. Artifact has done an amazing job providing us with an excellent foundation, and we have continued to evolve and refine the design.

Sam Browd, a neurosurgeon with the Sports Concussion Program at Seattle Children’s Hospital, and co-founder of Vicis, along with Per Reinhall, sketched out early ideas for the helmet based on the movements of tectonic plates.

The initial design of Zero1, created by Artefact, captured the traditional style that Vicis hoped to maintain, and Vicis engineers built on it to make it state-of-the-art technology.  The first sketches of the helmet were inspired by the movements of the tectonic plates

The initial design of Zero1, created by Artefact, captured the traditional style that Vicis hoped to maintain, and Vicis engineers built on it to make it state-of-the-art technology. The first sketches of the helmet were inspired by the movements of the tectonic plates

They then partnered with Marver to market the helmet. The first material was a small pink square with spacers and pads, which later evolved into the complex layered cores of the helmet after the team secured funding.

“It was tricky because players don’t want to play with a marshmallow on their head,” Marver told Bloomberg.

“That’s why we were delighted to find an outer shell material that felt traditional – hard, shiny, paintable – but deformed locally on impact.”

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